Ida Grove Library joins NASA and other organizations in celebrating the celestial event of the century

The Ida Grove Library has joined more than 1,000 libraries across the country to participate in the celestial event of the century, the August 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse. During this national event, the shadow of the moon will sweep across the United States in a narrow band from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean in a spectacle that hasn’t occurred in decades. In fact, the last total solar eclipse for the United States was nearly 40 years ago. The rest of the U.S. and North America will see a partial eclipse, with the Moon covering up only part of the Sun. It is aptly named the Great American Eclipse.

This will be a great opportunity for our community to celebrate science with fun, hands-on activities, culminating in the eclipse event on August 21, 2017.

On Monday August 21st, the library will host an Eclipse viewing party from 11am-1pm. During the viewing party, the library will be distributing solar viewing glasses along with information on safe eclipse viewing. The Grout Museum will be in attendance during the viewing with a special hands-on “Outreach to Space” exhibit for all ages, and there will be a live stream of the total eclipse from NASA.   NASA’s live stream will include a wealth of images captured before, during, and after the eclipse by 11 spacecraft, at least three NASA aircraft, more than 50 high-altitude balloons, and the astronauts aboard the International Space Station – each offering a unique vantage point for the celestial event.

The Ida Grove Library will also offer a range of public programs during the week of August 14, 2017 to bring the excitement of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) to children, teens and adults.   Our schedule of events includes daily craft activities (while supplies last) as well as two special movie viewings. Scheduled activities the week of August 14th include:

Monday August 14th 1-2pm: Sun Catchers

Tuesday August 15th 1-2pm: Solar Art Prints

Wednesday August 16th 1-3pm: Eclipse Coloring

Thursday August 17th 1-2pm: Sundials

Thursday August 17th @ 5:30pm: Movie Night showing Apollo 13

Friday August 18th @10:30am: Children’s movie showing E.T. & a special solar s’mores making session after the movie

“We are excited that the Ida Grove Library will have the opportunity to participate in this national program,” said Angela Scales, library director.  “We have received tremendous support from the Shopko Foundation to help our community prepare for and enjoy this amazing astronomy event. We think people of all ages and backgrounds will find the solar eclipse to be an experience they will remember the rest of their lives.” More information on the scheduled events and safe eclipse viewing can be found on the library’s website at www.idagrove.lib.ia.us.

Ida Grove Library is located at 100 East 2nd Street.  All of the scheduled eclipse programs are free and open to the public during library hours. Solar viewing glasses will be available free of charge as well during the eclipse viewing event.

Ida Grove Library has joined the STAR Library Education Network (STAR_Net) and its NASA@ My Library initiative, which is providing resources and STEM activities to libraries across the nation related to the eclipse. Partners include NASA, the American Library Association, and many other organizations. This project was made possible through support from the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Google, and the National Science Foundation.

Fireworks Use in the City Limits

The Battle Creek 4th of July Show is one of the best ways to enjoy fireworks

While fireworks are nothing new to Iowa small towns around the 4th of July holiday, capitol hill legislation has made sales and use of certain fireworks legal this year. Here are some tidbits of information for all Ida Grovians to consider this inaugural year:

– The legislated fireworks can only be displayed/set off on the user’s property or another private citizen’s property who has agreed to the use.

– Our city’s noise ordinance is still in effect and applies to fireworks use; no noise-oriented fireworks after 10pm per our noise ordinance.

– Fireworks cannot be used in city parks or other public areas unless allowed by city council decision.

Safety is also a key factor in using fireworks; local hospitals see a rise in burn victims during this time of year. Use common sense and caution.

 

Relay Iowa Is Coming to Ida Grove!

Relay Iowa Comes through Ida Grove

Runners and support staff participating in Relay Iowa will be in Ida Grove on Friday, June 9th, 2017.

Relay Iowa is the World’s Longest Relay Run! Teams of up to 12 participants run 339 miles to cross Iowa over a long weekend. Runners build their own team and then work together to break down the distance into segments of their choice.

There will be many people and extra vehicles in and around Ida Grove for this event. The route from Anthon to Ida Grove can be seen at http://www.mapmyrun.com/routes/view/859820157. The route from Ida Grove to Lake City is shown at http://www.mapmyrun.com/routes/view/859995567. Please watch for the runners and their support on your way to and from work to help keep them and yourselves safe.

Keep your eyes peeled for runners during this special event

Ida Area Farmer’s Market Makes 2017 Debut Thursday, June 1st!

It’s starting again this upcoming Thursday, June 1st! Come to the Ida Area Farmers’ Market, located east of our downtown Main and 2nd Street intersection. Fresh produce Thursdays from 4:30-6:30 p.m. June 1 through September 28, 2017. It’s local, it’s fresh, it supports our community members. Vendors and their wares include Cherri Sloan, baked goods; Cocoa Bellissimo, artisan chocolates (part time); K & S Produce (Kenny Tietsort & Doug VanHouten), produce; Lakefront Gardens & Gifts (Genevieve Voss), home decor, jewelry, misc.; Faith Johnson, fresh flowers; Shettler’s Gardens, produce; Old Town Vineyard & Winery (John & Lenee Sinnott), wine & wine tasting; Thankful Harvest (Tom & Grace German), organic meat, produce, & baked goods; Quimby Street Creations (Gloria Sykes), knitted items (part time); Susan Spotts, produce; and Golden Horizons will be there the last Thursday of every month selling handmade crafts. Some of the produce available the first day will be asparagus and rhubarb. The Heritage Days Board will also be on hand to grill out as a fundraiser for our hometown celebration occurring the final week of June.

It’s fresh. It’s local. It benefits our community!

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Home Repair Loan and Grant Program

The USDA has announced a housing program for low income individuals

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development administers a home repair program for very low income individuals. The goal of the program is to make sure homeowners have safe and sanitary living conditions. An added benefit of this program for the community is an improvement to the current housing. Another benefit is the ability to allow elderly residents to stay in their homes longer by making improvements. Details of the program can be found at Ida Grove City Hall or the following website: http://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/single-family-housing-repair-loans-grants

 

Trace’s Buseum Exhibit, “At Home in the Heartland” comes to the Ida Grove Public Library

bus-eum2TRACES will bring its mobile exhibit “At Home in the Heartland: Forgotten Stories of How Iowans Got to be ‘Us’” to the Ida Grove Library on Sunday, October 2nd 2016. It is housed in a retrofitted school bus, the “BUS-eum.”

TRACES Center for History and Culture doesn’t have all the answers, but it does have many questions needed to help find them. From queries like: Who are “we” as Iowans and as a nation? How’d we get to be the way we are? How have we changed over time—or not—and how might we change in the future?

The Iowa that existed as little as 35 years ago is gone. Sweeping, long-term changes in the region’s agriculture, economy, technology, politics and its ethnic, age or other demographics have altered the ways we live. In the process we have lost old treasures even as we have gained new possibilities. All this can be examined, together.
The exhibit curator holds that “While the failure to transfer practical information hobbles young people’s later job skills and economic performance, the failure to transfer cultural information erodes their social skills. Cultural competency understands how we became who we are, how we changed over time—or not—and how humans change at all. It informs us how we behave as individuals, how we live together and how we govern ourselves.”
Between now and Election Day, TRACES will take its exhibit to all 99 Iowa counties on three different tours, showing at diverse venues: schools, libraries, colleges, museums and other institutions. The public exhibit showing of the Bus-eum in Ida Grove will begin at 2pm on Sunday, October 2nd at the Ida Grove Public Library with the workshop to begin at 2:30pm in the Heritage Room of the Library.

Michael Luick-Thrams is a Ph.D. historian (Humboldt Universität, Berlin), educator and speaker. While the overall tour focuses on Iowa history, his forty years of family research has yielded hundreds of photos, maps or other documentation that offer a narrative look into Iowa history. Docent Irving Kellman guides visitors through the BUS.
Luick-Thrams says, “TRACES gathers, preserves and presents stories of people’s lives, past and present–many of which have lain beneath dust left by time’s passage. By learning lessons from the past, we might rise above what otherwise could demean us and keeps us from moving forward as individuals, families, communities and a nation.”
Founded in 2001, TRACES brings people of different backgrounds and perspectives together to speak with each other, openly and respectfully, in order to exchange experiences and opinions. In the process, old stereotypes and current ideological limits shift, making space for new possibilities when people humbly encounter one another. It taps the past for clues about what to avoid repeating in the future, as well as what has worked well in the past that might serve us well now as we seek a better way forward towards a more sustainable and peaceable world.
TRACES first focused on WWII history. Now that that generation mostly is gone and new crises face us, however, it is shifting its focus from preserving “traces” of WWII to issues of civic life: What have been our strengths and weaknesses over time as communities; what resources do we possess at present; what futures are open to us—solo and as a society—as we face numerous trials and grope forward? In response to current challenges, TRACES focuses on issues of family history juxtaposed over that of communities as a fulcrum for deliberate social change.
Admission is free, in part with support from: Humanities Iowa, the John K. & Luise V. Hanson and the Martha-Ellen Tye Foundations, Chester P. Luick Memorial Trust, Vander Haags Inc. and local hosts. Details about both the tour and TRACES can be found at: http://roots.traces.org/at-home-in-the-heartland or staff@TRACES.org